Sunday, May 24, 2020

Desirees Baby Analysis Essay - 1415 Words

Abstract This essay will focus on the short story by Kate Chopin and its use of symbols, setting and characters. Desiree’s baby was perhaps one of the best stories I’ve ever read. Analyzing it was not easy at all. Its use of symbols was very hard to comprehend. At first, it doesn’t make sense. But as you think critically, all the symbols, and setting and the characters in this literature plunge together in one amazing story. Literary Analysis on Kate Chopins Desirees Baby â€Å"Tell me what it means!† she cried despairingly.† It means,† he answered lightly, â€Å"that the child is not white; it means that you are not white† (Chopin, p. 192). Kate Chopins Desirees Baby is a well-known short story. â€Å"In her life, Kate Chopin†¦show more content†¦In the very beginning Desiree was left on a stone pillar at the Valmonde estate; it is also here that Armand Aubigny sees her and falls instantly in love with her. The stone pillar is a symbol of firm, forced male dominance in a patriarchal society. It is how men were of superior to anybody else. Desiree grew into a beautiful and gentle-hearted young woman and soon found a wealthy suitor asking for her hand. This young suitor was Armand Aubigny. He had known of Desiree’s past but was in love and did not care. Armand Aubigny’s character in this story was racist and despicable but the young bride was in love and looked past his faulty character. Early in the story the narrator describes the scenery of the plantation, LAbri, which was owned by the Aubigny and says, young Aubignys rule was a strict one, too, and under it his Negroes had forgotten how to be gay, as they had been during the old masters easy-going and indulgent lifetime (Chopin, p. 190). This shows Aubignys egotism and indifference toward his slaves. His treatment of the slaves as possessions rather than human beings reveals that Aubigny has no consideration when dealing with blacks. The way Madame Valmonde described the LAbri as â€Å"a sad looking place, which for many years had not known the gentle presence of a mistress† (Chopin, p. 190), may have been a hint at Armand’s evil nature in the story. He was raised without a mother. His motherShow MoreRelatedDesirees Baby Literary Analysis1989 Words   |  8 Pagesstories Desirees Baby, The Story of an Hour, At the Cadian Ball, and A Pair of Silk Stockings, were w ritten in the 19th century in times when women had no rights, and had to portray an image of a loving wife. They were considered selfish if they thought otherwise, and their job was to make their husbands happy at all times. This was the century of a turning point for women, in which they had desires test their limits imposed on their sex. Critics of her stories list the analysis of assumptionsRead More Kate Chopins Desirees Baby Essays1394 Words   |  6 PagesKate Chopins Desirees Baby This essay will focus on the short story by Kate Chopin and its use of symbols, setting and characters. Desiree’s baby was perhaps one of the best stories I’ve ever read. Analyzing it was not easy at all. Its use of symbols was very hard to comprehend. At first, it doesn’t make sense. But as you think criticallyRead MoreDà ©sirà ©es Baby Character Analysis1087 Words   |  5 PagesSocial Class, Gender, and Racial Value in Chopin’s Dà ©sirà ©e’s Baby Taking place in antebellum Louisiana, Kate Chopin’s Dà ©sirà ©e’s Baby places a strong focus on social class, gender, and racial value. Two characters that are limited by their acceptance of these are Dà ©sirà ©e and Armand, husband and wife with a newborn boy. Dà ©sirà ©e grew up at the Valmondà © residence where she was abandoned at a young age and Armand is a part of the elite planter class. Dà ©sirà ©e’s unknown ancestry along with being raised in aRead MoreDesirees Baby Analysis Essay1333 Words   |  6 PagesKeah Graul Sister Lizzie Jones English 314 Section 7 28 October 2017 TITLE In Kate Chopin’s story, â€Å"Desiree’s Baby† she tells of a story set in Louisiana in the mid-nineteenth century on a white plantation some time before the Civil War when slavery was still legal. Readers will see the unraveling of a marriage because of assumptions and hatred that will lead to heartbreak. In this story, the readers will explore the impacts of racism and racial inequality and how the racial tension of the timeRead MoreLiterary Analysis Of Desirees Baby1022 Words   |  5 PagesIn Kate Chopin’s short story, â€Å"Desiree’s Baby,† Armand Aubigny experienced the happiest marriage one could ever hope for with Desiree. They even have a romantic â€Å"love at first sight† experience. But then all of this is thrown away because of Armand. â€Å"Desiree’s Baby† has a significant impact on its readers because of the irony of Armand’s actions. Chopin describes this through his complex characterization whic h may explain why racism is able to thrive for centuries. One charming feature of Armand’sRead MoreLiterary Analysis Of Desirees Baby854 Words   |  4 Pages Desiree’s Baby by Kate Chopin Kate Chopin was a strong intellectual woman, but was she a racist? From my knowledge of reading â€Å"Desiree’s Baby† I believe that she is not a racist, but the story is and it contains a big factor of prejudice, but there is so much more to the story than just prejudice. This story contains motherhood, genetic inheritance, and of course racism. A true mother doesn’t see their child’s imperfections or their short comings. Madame Valmonde takes in this little girl inRead MoreAnalysis of Desiree’s Baby by Kate Chopin1328 Words   |  6 PagesDesiree’s Baby and Southern Social Structure The short story Desiree’s Baby by Kate Chopin provides a sobering depiction of how the dark forces of prejudice and social hierarchy tore apart a plantation owning family in the state of Louisiana. Desiree’s character is that of a lady who carries the burden of being submissive to a domineering husband, a role she keeps until the very end of the narrative. Desiree is portrayed as an agent of light so to speak throughout the plotline but is seriously blindedRead MoreEssay on Formalistic Analysis of Kate Chopins Desirees Baby946 Words   |  4 PagesFormalistic Analysis of Dà ©sirà ©e’s Baby  Ã‚   The short story â€Å"Dà ©sirà ©e’s Baby† is told by a third person omniscient point of view. The narrator, whose character or relationship to the story never receives any discussion, is a seemingly all-knowing observer of the situation. Although the narrator does not take sides towards issues that arise during the course of the text, her general view does shape the overall characterization of the white Southern society. The text exhibits interesting cluesRead MoreAn Analysis Of Armand Aubigny s Desiree s Baby 1538 Words   |  7 PagesArmand Aubigny’s Pride in â€Å"Desiree’s Baby† by Kate Chopin Through history, we have always yearned independence and equality as human beings. Undoubtedly, Kate Chopin is an extraordinary example She has landed a commendable place among American writers worthy of recognition. Born in St. Louis, Missouri in 1850, Kate was raised by strong women who taught her the value of an education. Her family gave her a revolutionary vision and a feminist personality, but it was her talented and passionate skillsRead MoreThemes And Summary In Desirees Baby, By Kate Chopin1242 Words   |  5 PagesSummary: The story of â€Å"Desirees Baby† by Kate Chopin opens up with Madame Valmondà © going to visit Desiree and her infant. On her journey to L’Abri, a plantation owned by Armand Aubigny, she reminisces about Desiree’s youth. Desiree was an abandoned baby found by Monsieur Valmondà ©. Madame Valmondà © trusted Desiree was sent to her by God as she was not able to have her own children. Eight years has passed and Armand Aubigny, the son of a wealthy cruel master, suddenly falls in love with Desiree

Wednesday, May 13, 2020

Reasons Human Trafficking Should End - 1144 Words

â€Å"Slavery occurs when one person controls another person, using violence or the threat of violence to maintain that control, exploits them economically, pays them nothing and they cannot walk away.† In 1865, slavery was abolished here in the United States. It states in the thirteenth amendment that, â€Å"neither slavery, nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction.† Even though it states that slavery is illegal in the thirteenth amendment, human trafficking is equivalent to modern slavery and it still exist today in the United States. Human trafficking happens when someone owes money, is kidnapped, or tricked. Then those victims are sold into slavery to be exploited. The people involved in trafficking are usually pimps or people who sell drugs. Although pimps think human trafficking betters the economy, it should be ende d because it abuses the victim, sexually exploits underage children, and brings false hope. First of all, human trafficking should be ended because it abuses the victims. When I think of human trafficking, the two words that pop in my head are pimps and prostitution. Pimps are men who use manipulation, threats, and violence to keep women from leaving. In the beginning, a pimp will look for a woman who is emotionally fragile, unprotected, and looking for love. The pimp then proceeds to act like he cares for the woman.Show MoreRelatedHuman Trafficking Is Today s Version Of Slavery873 Words   |  4 PagesWe Are People Human trafficking is today’s version of slavery. Victims are forced into labor, prostitution, and other exploitations. In 2007 three brothers conspired together to trafficked women from Mexico to New York, Queens. The brothers threatened, assaulted, and psychologically coerced the young women and minors into prostitution. These men were committed to sex trafficking that one of the brothers, Victor Leonel Estrada- Tepal, forced his wife, who was only seventeen at the time, into theirRead MoreCalling Apple, Inc. to Take Action on Human Trafficking Essay1297 Words   |  6 PagesHuman trafficking is an extremely important issue that we can’t ignore, even we are in a peaceful and legal society. As a matter of fact, there are a large number of institutions, like governments, special interest group, NGOs, social work teams, devoting themselves to call for human rights equality, combat human trafficking, and rescue those people who have been enslaved. However, as business co mmunity, only a small group of firms engage in this issue, and fulfill their social responsibilities.Read MoreTamara Johnson. Mr. Migues. Honors English 3. 13 February1022 Words   |  5 Pages2015 Human Trafficking Human trafficking,the illegal practice of trading in human beings for the purpose of prostitution, forced labor, or other forms of exploitation, is a crime that affects the most vulnerable citizens of society. After drugs, it the largest criminal activity globally! The victims must be the primary concern for all law enforcement units. Human trafficking in the world can be diminished and possibly erased through teachings, government intervention, and awareness. Human traffickingRead MoreHuman Trafficking : A Form Of Modern Slavery1601 Words   |  7 PagesHuman trafficking, or the offering and purchasing of individual, is a well-shrouded yet noticeable issue inside of today s general public. It is both a corrupt and awful theme that needs conveyed to consideration and managed. At the point when people are controlled into work, sexual bondage, or monetary hardship, human trafficking is happening. Human trafficking transpires to be a highly committed crime thats, perpetrated throughout the world, affecting women and children that being put throughRead MoreForced Labor And Human Trafficking1474 Words   |  6 Pagesand human trafficking are some of the forms of slavery in the modern day. Although the world has made several strides in ending human trafficking, several factors have played a big role in ensuring that trafficking is still carried on. The ILO describes forced labor as the work and services offered by a person unwillingly; on th e other hand human trafficking is the transport and recruitment of people through coercion with the aim of exploiting them. The continual practice of human trafficking is attributedRead MoreHuman Trafficking Should Be Stopped For Multiple Reasons916 Words   |  4 PagesHuman trafficking is criminal activity in which humans such as men, women, and children are consider as possessions for involuntary labor or prostitution. Although human trafficking is thought of being a problem only in other countries, it is also a growing problem in the United States, and should be stopped for multiple reasons. Many Americans do not have to deal with human trafficking as a part of their daily lives and only assume that it happens in foreign countries or in movies. In reality thisRead MoreWays to Stop Human Trafficking1245 Words   |  5 PagesSolutions to End Human Trafficking In recent times, the number of human trafficking cases has skyrocketed through the roof. So, what exactly is human trafficking? Human trafficking is defined as a criminal activity, in which people are recruited, harboured, transported, bought or kidnapped for the purposes of exploitation. These exploitations include forced labour, child soldiery, sexual slavery, forced marriages and so on. Statistics show that the main victims of human trafficking consist of womenRead MorePlan of Action for Human Trafficking and Sexual Violence1522 Words   |  7 PagesPlan of Action to Combat Human Trafficking Abstract Human trafficking is a crime that without the proper direction will cost the human being the right to have freedom. Every person has the right to choose and not fall into being victimized by someone who is in the pursuit of indentured servitude. This billion-dollar industry is aiding the criminal acts such as drug trafficking and production, sexual assault, sexual rape (male or female), and most of all abuse and neglect of all the victimsRead MoreSexual Human Trafficking and Forced Labor in Russia848 Words   |  3 PagesHuman Trafficking is the trade of humans for a variety of reasons, the most common of which is forced labor and sexual exploitation. Sexual Human Trafficking is a form of abuse entailing the sexual abuse of a person whereby a person is forced to conduct sexual acts for financial advantage. Unfortunately, it is a continuing issue today in many locations, especially Russia. Between thirty and sixty thousand woman are trafficked under false pretenses each year. Human t rafficking in Russia is very muchRead MoreHuman Trafficking Is A Serious Crime And An Unrefined Violation Of Human Rights1578 Words   |  7 PagesTrafficking in human beings is a serious crime and an unrefined violation of human rights. It is often linked to organized crime and is one of the most profitable criminal activities worldwide (Access to European Union Law, 2014). There are many different forms of human trafficking, and they progress with changing socioeconomic circumstances. It targets women and men, girls and boys in vulnerable positions (Trafficking in Human Beings, 2013). The International Labor Organization in June of 2012 covering

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Tradition Innovation (History of Architecture) Free Essays

string(46) " see programs in Stierlin 2001, 105, 106 \) \." Tradition A ; Innovation ( history of architecture ) Much great architecture of the yesteryear has proceeded by polishing rigorous conventions without truly oppugning them. A much smaller organic structure of work has moved frontward through extremist invention. Use illustrations to demo ( among other things ) that what appears to be radicalism or preservation is non ever what it seems. We will write a custom essay sample on Tradition Innovation (History of Architecture) or any similar topic only for you Order Now You could follow a sequence in one topographic point ( such as Brunelleshi ‘s Florence or Pericles ‘ Athens ) or run more widely pulling trial instances from assorted times and topographic points. The Athenian Parthenon has captured the imaginativeness for about two and half thousand old ages. Writers frequently speak of it as the finest architectural accomplishment of the Greeks, incarnating the classical values of harmoniousness and restraint, composure, pose and repose, proportion and economic system ( eg Sowerby 1995, 168 ) . However, the Parthenon is simply one of legion edifices completed as portion of the alleged Periclean edifice programme of the 2nd half of the 5th century BC, which can be examined for the manner their designers made usage of tradition and invention. Other edifices, such as the hypostyle Periclean Odeion that owes much to non-Greek Iranian traditions, likely due to their province of saving and less appealing scene, have tended to be sidelined in treatments of this nature, but are of import however. This essay will first discuss invention and tradition in the development the Grecian temple from its beginnings to the mid-fifth century BC and so research invention and tradition in the Periclean edifice programme itself, associating these to the wider context of Grecian temple architecture. For the Greeks, architecture was a term reserved for public and sacred edifices as opposed to private and domestic buildings ( Whitley 2001, 279 ) . Of these public and sacred edifices, the temple is possibly the most well-known and characteristic signifier, which besides incorporated into their programme sculpture, painting and composing ( Richter 1987, 19 ) . Temples possibly developed from the Mycenaean megaron, a rectangular edifice with a columned porch that formed the cardinal edifice of Late Bronze Age castles ( see program in Stierlin 2001, 34 ) but their beginning in early apsidal edifices, such as that of Lefkandi seems more assured ( see program in Johnston 1993, 25 ) . The architectural significance of these edifices is that they make usage of the colonnade, making an outer portico around the cella ( the inside edifice ) and can therefore be described as peristyle or peripteral ( of a temple ) . Presumably this development occurred from the practical concern of roofing th ese big edifices, which besides used an axial colonnade for support, but was retained, going possibly the specifying feature of Grecian temples, surely still seeable in those of much later periods including the Periclean Parthenon. The reversible roof besides led to the creative activity of a pediment, the triangular infinite or gable formed by the roof above the entryway that would be used to border architectural sculpture. An early illustration of such a adorned pediment from the early 6th century BC is from the temple of Artemis on Corfu ( Johnston 1993, 47-48 ) . It is interesting that, for whatever ground, the apsis was non retained in ulterior edifices and alternatively an opisthodomos ( an unfastened room at the dorsum of the temple, sometimes used as a exchequer ) was sometimes present ( for a temple groundplan see Richter 1987, 22 ) . These alterations in layout are shown by the sequence of temples at Thermon between the 9th and late 7th centuries BC ( see program in Stierl in 2001, 42 ) . Thus the development of the temple signifier was one in which tradition and invention can be seen from the beginning. The earlier edifices were non the great marble buildings of ulterior times but were constructed of wood with thatched roofs ( Stierlin 2001, 44 ) . Over clip rock and tile came to replace wood ; sometimes instead than strike harding down a temple and get downing from abrasion, wooden columns would be replaced in situ by rock columns in a procedure known as petrifaction ( Stierlin 2001, 46 ) . The ancient Greek tourer and author Pausanias ( 5.16.1 ) vividly described an ancient oak pillar still in topographic point in the rock temple of Hera at Olympia. Columns of assorted diameters made up of different Numberss of column membranophones can still be seen at this temple, attesting to the ad hoc nature of the temple’s transmutation. Replacing wood with rock besides led to the petrifying in rock of some of the noteworthy architectural characteristics of the wooden temples – fluted columns, triglyphs, dentils, gutae, roof building and coffering for illustration ( see Boardma n 1993, 122 and Richter 1987, 25 for illustrations ; Stierlin 2001, 48 ) . This heterotaxy into rock conserved the signifier of temples that had developed in wood but the act of petrifaction is itself advanced. It might be speculated that rock immortalised the temple and made it a adjustment and lasting place for the God. Before continuing to discourse tradition and invention in the Periclean edifice programme, a few words should be said about the development of the two chief Grecian orders, the Doric and Ionic ( see comparative illustrations in Stierlin 2001, 49-50 ) as these are cardinal to understanding the development of the Acropolis. The Doric order developed in the Grecian mainland and Greek southern Italy and Sicily and is typified by broader columns without bases, tapering towards the top, heavier entablature with jumping triglyphs and metopes, the latter sometimes with carven ornament ( Stierlin 2001, 52 ) . A hexastyle ( sic column ) facade was usual. The Ionic order developed subsequently ( c590BC ) in Grecian Asia Minor. Columns were more slender, had moulded bases and were non markedly tapered. The capital had two spiral-scroll spirals and the lighter entablature was non broken into triglyphs/metope form, leting uninterrupted ornament. From the groundplans, Ionic temples, such as that of Heraion at Samos and Artemision of Ephesus besides appear more hypostyle than peristyle, holding two ( dipteral ) rows of columns instead than the Doric one and frequently with an octostyle ( eight column ) frontage ( see programs in Stierlin 2001, 105, 106 ) . You read "Tradition Innovation (History of Architecture)" in category "Essay examples" The two orders have been contrasted as masculine, knee bend, unsmooth and feminine, elegant and refined severally ( Stierlin 2001, 49 ) and at the clip of the Periclean edifice programme were ‘still basically distinguishable regional styles’ ( Rhodes 1995, 54 ) . The Periclean temple to Athena Parthenos, or Parthenon, was built between 447 and 438BC by the designers Iktinos and Kallikrates and the sculpturer Phidias, and formed the centerpiece of the edifice programme of the political leader Pericles ( Stierlin 2001, 183 ) . This programme sought to laud Athens and in the instance of the Acropolis, to retrace the temples burned by the Persians in the early 5th century BC. It has been said to tag ‘the flood tide of the Doric style’ for the harmoniousness of its proportions, the polishs in its construction and its sculptural ornaments ( Richter 1987, 33 ) . However, in comparing to the somewhat earlier temple of Zeus at Olympia ( finished about 460BC ) , we can see that while the latter is about strictly Doric in manner, ‘the Parthenon’s signifier and spirit partakes liberally of the Ionic’ ( Rhodes 1995, 74 ) . This combination of Doric and Ionic can clearly be seen on a groundplan ( eg Stierlin 2001, 191 ) , w hich reveal an octostyle peripteral Doric portico ( 8 by 17 columns ) , instead than a Doric hexastyle, while six more slender Doric columns behind the octostyle frontages suggest a dipteral colonnade, an Ionic characteristic. The cella was divided into two suites, a smaller western room, the Hall of the Virgins and the eastern naos that housed the statue of the Athena, both approached from the exterior and non connected. The Hall of the Virgins contained four Ionic columns while the naos was divided into three naves by a overlying Doric colonnade following the walls and returning behind the statue, a first in temple architecture ( Rhodes 1995, 87 ) . Of class the usage of an Ionic frieze around the cella should non be overlooked. The Parthenon seems advanced in its deliberate commixture of Doric and Ionic elements ( Rhodes 1995, 146 ) . However, some of these elements that may look advanced can be found elsewhere and on much earlier temples. For illustration, the 6th century Doric peripteral temple of Artemis on Corfu had an octostyle facade and the same proportion of columns ( 8 by 17 ) as the mid-fifth century Parthenon, every bit good as two rows of columns in the cella ( Lawrence1996, 77 ) . The temple of Athena at Paestum in southern Italy is a Doric hexastyle temple of around 510BC but the interior portico utilizations eight Ionic columns in an Ionic agreement ( Stierlin 2001, 74 ; see program in Richter 1987, 30 ) . It was besides noted that the Parthenon made usage of overlying porticoes in the naos ( see Reconstruction in Boardman 1993, 118 ) . These were besides used in the modern-day 2nd temple of Hera at Paestum ( 460-440BC ) and Stierlin suggested that in the instance of the latter they may hold been used as a deliberate archaizing component, mentioning to the temple of Aphaia on Aegina, built around 500BC ( Stierlin 2001, 79 ; comparison exposures in Stierlin 2001, 78 and 148 ) . In a needfully ( to suit the expansive statue of Athena ) broad temple like the Parthenon, 30.88m at the stylobate, they may hold been more practical every bit good as attractive. It can so be seen that while the Parthenon may be advanced in the context of mainland Greek temples, there are analogues in the Grecian temples of southern Italy and Sicily that provide case in points for blending Doric and Ionic characteristics ( Rhodes 1995, 198n12 ) every bit good as characteristics from Archaic temples on Corfu and Aegina. The frequently discussed architectural polish of the curvature or splaying of the Parthenon was besides a traditional Doric solutions to drainage, although in the Parthenon it succeeds in forestalling the temple from looking knee bend ( Rhodes 1995, 74 ) . The chief factor in the l ayout of the Parthenon was in fact the older temple that it replaced, instead than any genuinely fresh programs. The designers of the Parthenon did non work in isolation but in a cultural and lingual zone stretching from Italy to Cyprus, with mainland Greece in the center and while the Parthenon is every bit alone as every Grecian temple it may be said to hold incorporated traditional inventions in a traditional manner. Traveling on to see briefly two other Periclean edifices on the Acropolis, the Erechtheion and the Propylaia, the Erechtheion, ceremonially the most of import edifice of the Acropolis, is a existent invention in the sense that instead than being a canonical temple, it is fitted to the mythic and physical landscape of the Acropolis. As such, it was constructed on two degrees, though with three different roof degrees, and incorporated the cults of Athena in the east cella, and Poseidon-Erechtheus in the West cella and north porch ( Rhodes 1995, 131-36 ) . The Erechtheion is Ionic in its columns and friezes and provides a complement to the Parthenon with its human-shaped Karyatid columns following a hundred twelvemonth old Ionic tradition begun by the Siphnian Treasury at Delphi ( Stierlin 2001, 208 ) . The Propylaia, or gateway to the Acropolis foreshadowed this balance once more by integrating both traditional Doric hexastyle outside combined with an internal Ionic colonnade. Rhodes s ays of its designer: ‘Mnesikles’ greatest part to the history and way of Grecian architecture was likely his vision of Doric and Ionic as equal constituents of a greater Grecian architecture’ ( 1995, 73 ) . It is possible that in a sense the Parthenon is more important to its modern adorants than its builders and that there is a desire to warrant this by mention to invention. Grecian temples were built non on subjective rules of aesthetic beauty but on mathematical and spiritual rules of harmoniousness and temples that reflected a peculiar harmoniousness were successful ( Stierlin 2001, 64-74 ) . The Periclean edifice programme did non radically innovate from a inactive or dead tradition: the edifices examined above surely did unite many elements to accomplish their alone purposes but so no two Grecian temples were of all time the same. Throughout their 1000 plus twelvemonth history, Grecian temple edifices and their builders combined traditional elements with limited inventions that by and large belonged to the temple edifice tradition guided by the rules of harmoniousness –a temple should be temple, after all. Bibliography Boardman, J. 1993. ‘The Classical Period’ , in Boardman, J. ( ed. ) 1993.The Oxford History of Classical Art.Oxford: Oxford University Press, 83-150. Johnston, A. 1993. ‘Pre-Classical Greece’ , in Boardman, J. ( ed. ) 1993.The Oxford History of Classical Art.Oxford: Oxford University Press, 11-82. Lawrence, A.W. and Tomlinson, R.A. 1996.Grecian Architecture.( 5Thursdayedition, Pelican History of Art ) . New Haven and London: Yale University Press. Rhodes, R.F. 1995.Architecture and Meaning on the Acropolis.Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Richter, G.M.A. 1987.A Handbook of Greek Art.( 9Thursdayedition ) . Oxford: Phaidon. Sowerby, R. 1995.The Greeks.London: Routledge. Stierlin, H. 2001.Greece from Mycenae to the Parthenon.Koln: Taschen. Whitley, J. 2001.The Archaeology of Ancient Greece.Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. How to cite Tradition Innovation (History of Architecture), Essay examples Tradition Innovation (history of architecture) Free Essays string(46) " see programs in Stierlin 2001, 105, 106 \) \." Tradition A ; Innovation ( history of architecture ) Much great architecture of the yesteryear has proceeded by polishing rigorous conventions without truly oppugning them. A much smaller organic structure of work has moved frontward through extremist invention. Use illustrations to demo ( among other things ) that what appears to be radicalism or preservation is non ever what it seems. We will write a custom essay sample on Tradition Innovation (history of architecture) or any similar topic only for you Order Now You could follow a sequence in one topographic point ( such as Brunelleshi ‘s Florence or Pericles ‘ Athens ) or run more widely pulling trial instances from assorted times and topographic points. The Athenian Parthenon has captured the imaginativeness for about two and half thousand old ages. Writers frequently speak of it as the finest architectural accomplishment of the Greeks, incarnating the classical values of harmoniousness and restraint, composure, pose and repose, proportion and economic system ( eg Sowerby 1995, 168 ) . However, the Parthenon is simply one of legion edifices completed as portion of the alleged Periclean edifice programme of the 2nd half of the 5th century BC, which can be examined for the manner their designers made usage of tradition and invention. Other edifices, such as the hypostyle Periclean Odeion that owes much to non-Greek Iranian traditions, likely due to their province of saving and less appealing scene, have tended to be sidelined in treatments of this nature, but are of import however. This essay will first discuss invention and tradition in the development the Grecian temple from its beginnings to the mid-fifth century BC and so research invention and tradition in the Periclean edifice programme itself, associating these to the wider context of Grecian temple architecture. For the Greeks, architecture was a term reserved for public and sacred edifices as opposed to private and domestic buildings ( Whitley 2001, 279 ) . Of these public and sacred edifices, the temple is possibly the most well-known and characteristic signifier, which besides incorporated into their programme sculpture, painting and composing ( Richter 1987, 19 ) . Temples possibly developed from the Mycenaean megaron, a rectangular edifice with a columned porch that formed the cardinal edifice of Late Bronze Age castles ( see program in Stierlin 2001, 34 ) but their beginning in early apsidal edifices, such as that of Lefkandi seems more assured ( see program in Johnston 1993, 25 ) . The architectural significance of these edifices is that they make usage of the colonnade, making an outer portico around the cella ( the inside edifice ) and can therefore be described as peristyle or peripteral ( of a temple ) . Presumably this development occurred from the practical concern of roofing th ese big edifices, which besides used an axial colonnade for support, but was retained, going possibly the specifying feature of Grecian temples, surely still seeable in those of much later periods including the Periclean Parthenon. The reversible roof besides led to the creative activity of a pediment, the triangular infinite or gable formed by the roof above the entryway that would be used to border architectural sculpture. An early illustration of such a adorned pediment from the early 6th century BC is from the temple of Artemis on Corfu ( Johnston 1993, 47-48 ) . It is interesting that, for whatever ground, the apsis was non retained in ulterior edifices and alternatively an opisthodomos ( an unfastened room at the dorsum of the temple, sometimes used as a exchequer ) was sometimes present ( for a temple groundplan see Richter 1987, 22 ) . These alterations in layout are shown by the sequence of temples at Thermon between the 9th and late 7th centuries BC ( see program in Stierl in 2001, 42 ) . Thus the development of the temple signifier was one in which tradition and invention can be seen from the beginning. The earlier edifices were non the great marble buildings of ulterior times but were constructed of wood with thatched roofs ( Stierlin 2001, 44 ) . Over clip rock and tile came to replace wood ; sometimes instead than strike harding down a temple and get downing from abrasion, wooden columns would be replaced in situ by rock columns in a procedure known as petrifaction ( Stierlin 2001, 46 ) . The ancient Greek tourer and author Pausanias ( 5.16.1 ) vividly described an ancient oak pillar still in topographic point in the rock temple of Hera at Olympia. Columns of assorted diameters made up of different Numberss of column membranophones can still be seen at this temple, attesting to the ad hoc nature of the temple’s transmutation. Replacing wood with rock besides led to the petrifying in rock of some of the noteworthy architectural characteristics of the wooden temples – fluted columns, triglyphs, dentils, gutae, roof building and coffering for illustration ( see Boardma n 1993, 122 and Richter 1987, 25 for illustrations ; Stierlin 2001, 48 ) . This heterotaxy into rock conserved the signifier of temples that had developed in wood but the act of petrifaction is itself advanced. It might be speculated that rock immortalised the temple and made it a adjustment and lasting place for the God. Before continuing to discourse tradition and invention in the Periclean edifice programme, a few words should be said about the development of the two chief Grecian orders, the Doric and Ionic ( see comparative illustrations in Stierlin 2001, 49-50 ) as these are cardinal to understanding the development of the Acropolis. The Doric order developed in the Grecian mainland and Greek southern Italy and Sicily and is typified by broader columns without bases, tapering towards the top, heavier entablature with jumping triglyphs and metopes, the latter sometimes with carven ornament ( Stierlin 2001, 52 ) . A hexastyle ( sic column ) facade was usual. The Ionic order developed subsequently ( c590BC ) in Grecian Asia Minor. Columns were more slender, had moulded bases and were non markedly tapered. The capital had two spiral-scroll spirals and the lighter entablature was non broken into triglyphs/metope form, leting uninterrupted ornament. From the groundplans, Ionic temples, such as that of Heraion at Samos and Artemision of Ephesus besides appear more hypostyle than peristyle, holding two ( dipteral ) rows of columns instead than the Doric one and frequently with an octostyle ( eight column ) frontage ( see programs in Stierlin 2001, 105, 106 ) . You read "Tradition Innovation (history of architecture)" in category "Essay examples" The two orders have been contrasted as masculine, knee bend, unsmooth and feminine, elegant and refined severally ( Stierlin 2001, 49 ) and at the clip of the Periclean edifice programme were ‘still basically distinguishable regional styles’ ( Rhodes 1995, 54 ) . The Periclean temple to Athena Parthenos, or Parthenon, was built between 447 and 438BC by the designers Iktinos and Kallikrates and the sculpturer Phidias, and formed the centerpiece of the edifice programme of the political leader Pericles ( Stierlin 2001, 183 ) . This programme sought to laud Athens and in the instance of the Acropolis, to retrace the temples burned by the Persians in the early 5th century BC. It has been said to tag ‘the flood tide of the Doric style’ for the harmoniousness of its proportions, the polishs in its construction and its sculptural ornaments ( Richter 1987, 33 ) . However, in comparing to the somewhat earlier temple of Zeus at Olympia ( finished about 460BC ) , we can see that while the latter is about strictly Doric in manner, ‘the Parthenon’s signifier and spirit partakes liberally of the Ionic’ ( Rhodes 1995, 74 ) . This combination of Doric and Ionic can clearly be seen on a groundplan ( eg Stierlin 2001, 191 ) , w hich reveal an octostyle peripteral Doric portico ( 8 by 17 columns ) , instead than a Doric hexastyle, while six more slender Doric columns behind the octostyle frontages suggest a dipteral colonnade, an Ionic characteristic. The cella was divided into two suites, a smaller western room, the Hall of the Virgins and the eastern naos that housed the statue of the Athena, both approached from the exterior and non connected. The Hall of the Virgins contained four Ionic columns while the naos was divided into three naves by a overlying Doric colonnade following the walls and returning behind the statue, a first in temple architecture ( Rhodes 1995, 87 ) . Of class the usage of an Ionic frieze around the cella should non be overlooked. The Parthenon seems advanced in its deliberate commixture of Doric and Ionic elements ( Rhodes 1995, 146 ) . However, some of these elements that may look advanced can be found elsewhere and on much earlier temples. For illustration, the 6th century Doric peripteral temple of Artemis on Corfu had an octostyle facade and the same proportion of columns ( 8 by 17 ) as the mid-fifth century Parthenon, every bit good as two rows of columns in the cella ( Lawrence1996, 77 ) . The temple of Athena at Paestum in southern Italy is a Doric hexastyle temple of around 510BC but the interior portico utilizations eight Ionic columns in an Ionic agreement ( Stierlin 2001, 74 ; see program in Richter 1987, 30 ) . It was besides noted that the Parthenon made usage of overlying porticoes in the naos ( see Reconstruction in Boardman 1993, 118 ) . These were besides used in the modern-day 2nd temple of Hera at Paestum ( 460-440BC ) and Stierlin suggested that in the instance of the latter they may hold been used as a deliberate archaizing component, mentioning to the temple of Aphaia on Aegina, built around 500BC ( Stierlin 2001, 79 ; comparison exposures in Stierlin 2001, 78 and 148 ) . In a needfully ( to suit the expansive statue of Athena ) broad temple like the Parthenon, 30.88m at the stylobate, they may hold been more practical every bit good as attractive. It can so be seen that while the Parthenon may be advanced in the context of mainland Greek temples, there are analogues in the Grecian temples of southern Italy and Sicily that provide case in points for blending Doric and Ionic characteristics ( Rhodes 1995, 198n12 ) every bit good as characteristics from Archaic temples on Corfu and Aegina. The frequently discussed architectural polish of the curvature or splaying of the Parthenon was besides a traditional Doric solutions to drainage, although in the Parthenon it succeeds in forestalling the temple from looking knee bend ( Rhodes 1995, 74 ) . The chief factor in the l ayout of the Parthenon was in fact the older temple that it replaced, instead than any genuinely fresh programs. The designers of the Parthenon did non work in isolation but in a cultural and lingual zone stretching from Italy to Cyprus, with mainland Greece in the center and while the Parthenon is every bit alone as every Grecian temple it may be said to hold incorporated traditional inventions in a traditional manner. Traveling on to see briefly two other Periclean edifices on the Acropolis, the Erechtheion and the Propylaia, the Erechtheion, ceremonially the most of import edifice of the Acropolis, is a existent invention in the sense that instead than being a canonical temple, it is fitted to the mythic and physical landscape of the Acropolis. As such, it was constructed on two degrees, though with three different roof degrees, and incorporated the cults of Athena in the east cella, and Poseidon-Erechtheus in the West cella and north porch ( Rhodes 1995, 131-36 ) . The Erechtheion is Ionic in its columns and friezes and provides a complement to the Parthenon with its human-shaped Karyatid columns following a hundred twelvemonth old Ionic tradition begun by the Siphnian Treasury at Delphi ( Stierlin 2001, 208 ) . The Propylaia, or gateway to the Acropolis foreshadowed this balance once more by integrating both traditional Doric hexastyle outside combined with an internal Ionic colonnade. Rhodes s ays of its designer: ‘Mnesikles’ greatest part to the history and way of Grecian architecture was likely his vision of Doric and Ionic as equal constituents of a greater Grecian architecture’ ( 1995, 73 ) . It is possible that in a sense the Parthenon is more important to its modern adorants than its builders and that there is a desire to warrant this by mention to invention. Grecian temples were built non on subjective rules of aesthetic beauty but on mathematical and spiritual rules of harmoniousness and temples that reflected a peculiar harmoniousness were successful ( Stierlin 2001, 64-74 ) . The Periclean edifice programme did non radically innovate from a inactive or dead tradition: the edifices examined above surely did unite many elements to accomplish their alone purposes but so no two Grecian temples were of all time the same. Throughout their 1000 plus twelvemonth history, Grecian temple edifices and their builders combined traditional elements with limited inventions that by and large belonged to the temple edifice tradition guided by the rules of harmoniousness –a temple should be temple, after all. Bibliography Boardman, J. 1993. ‘The Classical Period’ , in Boardman, J. ( ed. ) 1993.The Oxford History of Classical Art.Oxford: Oxford University Press, 83-150. Johnston, A. 1993. ‘Pre-Classical Greece’ , in Boardman, J. ( ed. ) 1993.The Oxford History of Classical Art.Oxford: Oxford University Press, 11-82. Lawrence, A.W. and Tomlinson, R.A. 1996.Grecian Architecture.( 5Thursdayedition, Pelican History of Art ) . New Haven and London: Yale University Press. Rhodes, R.F. 1995.Architecture and Meaning on the Acropolis.Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Richter, G.M.A. 1987.A Handbook of Greek Art.( 9Thursdayedition ) . Oxford: Phaidon. Sowerby, R. 1995.The Greeks.London: Routledge. Stierlin, H. 2001.Greece from Mycenae to the Parthenon.Koln: Taschen. Whitley, J. 2001.The Archaeology of Ancient Greece.Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. How to cite Tradition Innovation (history of architecture), Essay examples

Monday, May 4, 2020

Makeovers R Us Risk Management Samples †MyAssignmenthelp.com

Question: Discuss about the Makeovers R Us Risk Management. Answer: Risk Management Planning Outline The risk management process will comprise of five major steps which are listed and described below. Risk Identification: The risks will be identified by determining the project factors involved and on the basis of the information collected through processes, such as interviews, brainstorming, observation, and documentation. The risks are will be listed on the basis of their risk category and type. Risk Analysis: The risk analysis step will be carried out on the basis of the identified risks. The risks will be listed and the likelihood, impact, and score will be assigned to every risk in the list. Risk Evaluation Prioritization: The risks will be evaluated on the basis of the risk score and will also be classified as acceptable and non-acceptable. The priority will be assigned to every risk. Risk Treatment Response: The risks that will be classified as non-acceptable will be assigned with a treatment and response strategy and the same will be applied to treat the risk. Risk Monitoring Control: The application of the treatment strategy will be monitored using the automated tools and review processes. The application of managerial control will also be involved in this step. Brief Description The project is being carried out by Makeovers R Us, an organization that has expertise in managing renovations of houses and gardens. The project client is Cecile, an accountant who wishes to get her kitchen renovated. The kitchen has to be renovated completely and there are specifications that have been listed out by Cecile. The decision on the selection of the contractor of the project by Cecile is based on the project schedule as five weeks, best storage solution, and reasonable temporary kitchen space. Tools, Techniques, and Processes The risk management process will have five phases involved as risk identification, risk analysis, risk evaluation and prioritization, risk treatment response, and risk monitoring control. The tools and techniques that will be involved in the process will include information investigation techniques as interviews, brainstorming, observation, and documentation. Root Cause Analysis is a technique that will be applied on the risks identified to find out further risks along with the checklist analysis. Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats (SWOT) analysis will be applied to under the project factors and to determine the risks. Data analytics tools will be used in the risk analysis process. Probability and impact analysis will be carried out to understand the risks that may require an immediate response. Positive Risks The primary criteria for Cecile are to ensure that the renovation of her kitchen is done in the specified project schedule and allocated budget. These two constraints may be used as an opportunity to fulfil the project objectives and turn the risks in the positive areas by accomplishing the project activities before the estimated schedule and under the estimated budget. There will be specific duration assigned to each of the project activities and the application of the efforts in the accurate direction will ensure that the project activities are completed within or before the schedule estimated. The same approach may be used in terms of the budget along with the negotiations with the suppliers and vendors. Consequence Likelihood Risk Consequence Rating Description of Possible Consequences Schedule Risks (Positive) High Positive feedback by Cecile and enhancement of organizational reputation Budget Risks (Positive) High Positive feedback by Cecile and enhancement of organizational reputation Technical Risks Moderate Disruption in the execution of project activities causing delays Environmental Risks Critical Inability to carry out renovation tasks due to poor weather conditions or other environmental changes Operational Risks Moderate Execution of the operational task that may not be rolled back Risk Likelihood Rating Description of Possible Likelihood Schedule Risks (Positive) Low Application of the effort in correct direction with resources outperforming their usual efficiency and productivity levels Budget Risks (Positive) Low Drop in the prices of tools and equipment, completion of project activities before estimated schedule, negotiations with the suppliers Technical Risks Moderate Breakdown or fault in the technical tool or equipment Environmental Risks Moderate Natural hazards, breakdown of electrical/power supply Operational Risks High Operational error by a resource Quantitative Risk Analysis Technique Decision tree analysis will be used to understand the possible risks, the alternative and the conditions that may impact the likelihood and consequences of the risks. A tree-like structure will be represented comprising of all the risks and the specific alternatives involved. Expected Monetary Value (EMV) analysis will be used as a risk analysis technique to calculate the outcomes of the risk situations identified. The monetary impact of the risk situations will be assessed through this technique. Risk Response Template The following template shall be used to provide risk response. Risk Register Risk Consequence Rating Critical 5 High 4 Moderate 3 Low 2 Insignificant - 1 Likelihood Rating Critical 5 High 4 Moderate 3 Low 2 Insignificant - 1 Risk Score (Consequences x Rating) Risk Response Strategy Schedule Risks (Positive) High Low 8 Risk Acceptance Budget Risks (Positive) High Low 8 Risk Acceptance Technical Risks Moderate Moderate 9 Risk Transfer Environmental Risks Critical Moderate 15 Risk Mitigation Operational Risks Moderate High 12 Risk Avoidance Risk Monitoring Control The risk register, results of gap analysis, and the list of approved change requests will be required for the purpose of risk monitoring and control. There will be techniques required for risk monitoring and control. The risk reassessment shall be done to understand the changes that may have happened in rating during the project lifecycle. Risk audits shall also be done to understand the effectiveness of the review process. Variance analysis must be done to find out the schedule and budget variance. The process shall also involve status meetings and reporting activities so that the risk status and the pending effort to be applied may be monitored and evaluated. Outline of the Report Element Identify Project Risks If specific volume or frequency is not stated , the evidence must be provided at least once Context Date of Observation/ Comments Satisfactory (Please Tick) Determine the risk objectives and standards for the project Risk Identification Step 28-02-2018 P Establish risk context and identify project risks Risk Identification Step 28-02-2018 P Classify project risks according to risk categories Risk Identification Step 28-02-2018 P Element Analyse Project Risks If specific volume or frequency is not stated , the evidence must be provided at least once Context Date of Observation/ Comments Satisfactory (Please Tick) Determine risk analysis classification criteria and apply to a risk ranking system for a project Risk Analysis Step 07-03-2018 P Follow risk analysis processes to analyse and qualify risks , threats, and opportunities that apply to a project Risk Analysis Step 07-03-2018 P Determine risk priorities and document the outcomes of risk analysis in a risk register Risk Analysis Step 07-03-2018 P Contribute to the development of a risk management plan Risk Analysis Step 07-03-2018 P Element Establish risk treatment and controls If specific volume or frequency is not stated , the evidence must be provided at least once Context Date of Observation/ Comments Satisfactory (Please Tick) Identify and document existing controls used for project risk management Risk Treatment Control Step 14-03-2018 P Consider and determine risk treatment options using agreed consultative methods and record outcome Risk Treatment Control Step 14-03-2018 P Update risk plans, allocating responsibility to appropriate team members Risk Treatment Control Step 14-03-2018 P Element Monitor and control project risks If specific volume or frequency is not stated , the evidence must be provided at least once Context Date of Observation/ Comments Satisfactory (Please Tick) Develop a process to review risk processes on a regular basis Risk Monitor Control Step 14-03-2018 P Develop strategies to monitor risk environment to identify changes circumstances impacting project risks Risk Monitor Control Step 14-03-2018 P Determine risk response to an identified change to circumstances Risk Monitor Control Step 14-03-2018 P Implement a risk response plan and modify plans to maintain currency of risk treatments and controls Risk Monitor Control Step 14-03-2018 P Element Assess risk management outcomes If specific volume or frequency is not stated , the evidence must be provided at least once Context Date of Observation/ Comments Satisfactory (Please Tick) Review project outcomes to determine effectiveness of risk management processes and procedures Assessment of Risk Management Outcomes 21-03-2018 P Identify and document risk management issues and recommended improvements for application to future projects Assessment of Risk Management Outcomes 21-03-2018 P Evaluation Criteria The risk management plan and its associated processes, policies, procedures, tools, techniques, and activities developed for Makeover R Us project are required to be evaluated. The evaluation process is carried in the monitoring and control phase of the project to come up with the positive and negative aspects along with the areas of improvement. The following evaluation criteria are used to understand the risk management plan and its associated mechanisms. Effectiveness: The risks associated with the project along with their status and completion will be assessed. Achieving project goals and objectives: The ability of the project to achieve its goals and objectives will be determined on the basis of the risks generated in the project and the treatment strategy. Impact: The impact of the risk management process and procedure on the project will be evaluated. Cost Variance: The actual and estimated values of the project costs will be analysed. The increased gaps will indicate the failure of the risk management plan and process and vice versa. Schedule Variance: The actual and estimated values of the project schedule will be analysed. The increased gaps will indicate the failure of the risk management plan and process and vice versa. Evaluation of Risk Management Processes The risk management process that has been used in the project has been illustrated below. The risks identified in the project are schedule risks, budget risks, technical risks, environmental risks, and operational risks. The risks management process has been evaluated as per the criteria above. Risk Name Effectiveness Project Goals Objectives Impact Cost Variance Schedule Variance Schedule Risks The risk has been treated using the risk avoidance and acceptance strategy by regular reviews and inspections. The negative impacts could be controlled as a result. The positive impacts were incorporated. The risk status is now closed. The risk did not have any negative effect on the project goals and objectives. The impacts were positive as the project activities could be completed before the estimated schedule. Less than 10% - within the tolerable limits Less than 10% - within the tolerable limits Budget Risks The risk has been treated using the risk avoidance and acceptance strategy by regular reviews and inspections. The negative impacts could be controlled as a result. The positive impacts were incorporated. The risk status is now closed. The risk did not have any negative effect on the project goals and objectives. The impacts were positive as the project activities could be completed within the estimated budget. Less than 10% - within the tolerable limits Less than 10% - within the tolerable limits Technical Risks The risk has been treated using risk transfer as the response strategy. The risk status is now closed. The risk did not have any negative effect on the project goals and objectives. The negative impacts were controlled due to implementation of risk management processes. Less than 10% - within the tolerable limits Less than 10% - within the tolerable limits Environmental Risks The risk has been treated using risk mitigation as the response strategy. The risk status is now closed. The risk did not have any negative effect on the project goals and objectives. The negative impacts were controlled due to implementation of risk management processes. Less than 10% - within the tolerable limits Less than 10% - within the tolerable limits Operational Risks The risk has been treated using risk avoidance as the response strategy. The risk status is now closed. The risk did not have any negative effect on the project goals and objectives. The negative impacts were controlled due to implementation of risk management processes. Less than 10% - within the tolerable limits Less than 10% - within the tolerable limits Evaluation of Policies Procedures The objectives of the risk management plan and mechanisms were to make sure that the project goals and objectives could be achieved as per the estimated budget and schedule. The risk management policies and procedures could be achieved as none of the risks are in the open state and there are no negative impacts of any of the risks identified. There were changes that had to be implemented to avoid, mitigate, and control the risks. The cost and schedule variance calculated in each case is less than 10%. As a result, the risk management policies and procedures are found to be effective, impactful, and adequate. Evaluation of Tools Techniques There were various techniques that were used in the process of data gathering and collection for identification and assessment of the risks. These techniques included surveys, interviews, observations, domain analysis, and brainstorming sessions. These techniques allowed the members of the project team members to have the data and information sets to prepare the list of the risks and to treat the same. Theproject management methodology asProject Management Body of Knowledge (PMBoK) was applied in the project and risk management knowledge areas was used to treat the risks. The analysis techniques, such as SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats), Pareto chart, and Cause Effect diagrams were used to assess and evaluate the risks. Areas of Improvements The evaluation process also highlighted some of the areas that could be improved in the process of risk management. The first area is the use data analytics tools in the process. These are the automated tools that may be applied on the data and information sets to identify the associated patterns and trends that may be involved. These tools should have been used in the process of risk identification and risk assessment. The use of these tools would have provided the patterns that would have led to better prevention and treatment of the risks for root cause analysis. The second areas that are suggested for improvement in the risk management plan and process is the use of other automated tools for risk monitoring, control, and reporting. There are risks reporting tools that have been developed and should have been integrated so that risk reports were prepared and circulated to keep a track of the process.

Monday, March 30, 2020

Hawthorne The Myth of the Docile Worker Essay Essay Example

Hawthorne The Myth of the Docile Worker Essay Essay Reappraisal This diary begins with an debut to the ill-famed Hawthorne experiments led by Elton Mayo and Fritiz J. Roethlisberger. These experiments were based on Mayo’s belief in the demand to switch the focal point of direction from a scientific attack to one that valued human dealingss. The Hawthorne experiments surfaced as the innovator surveies of it’s clip in human direction psychological science. The consequences developed a theory known as the â€Å"Hawthorne effect† in which many have incorporated to organize the basicss of modern twenty-four hours human dealingss in commercialism. We will write a custom essay sample on Hawthorne The Myth of the Docile Worker Essay specifically for you for only $16.38 $13.9/page Order now We will write a custom essay sample on Hawthorne The Myth of the Docile Worker Essay specifically for you FOR ONLY $16.38 $13.9/page Hire Writer We will write a custom essay sample on Hawthorne The Myth of the Docile Worker Essay specifically for you FOR ONLY $16.38 $13.9/page Hire Writer Roethlisberger described the â€Å"Hawthorne effect† as an consciousness from the working category when particular attending is given by their directions therefore conveying about a positive alteration in productiveness. Today. the â€Å"Hawthorne effect† is even equated as merely handling employees good. Bramel is critical when pin-pointing the defects of the theory. Being unconcerned over the methodological analysis and truth of the experiments. he gives Mayo the benefit of the uncertainty and alternatively inquiries in peculiar two facets of the theory. The first of which is the premise that workers are easy manipulated by their higher directions to go constructive and cohesive with their fellow workers therefore increasing productiveness regardless of the working environment or economic system. The 2nd premise being. struggle between direction and it’s workers are due to external factors and downplays the fact that struggles of involvements between the two parties is inevitable. The truth remains that the house is exploitative in it’s capitalist nature. directors will invariably seek to increase productiveness whereas workers will ever look out for their ain economic involvement. Bramel’s reading of the Hawthorne consequence puts into play the fact that the capitalist recognizes that human dealingss is of import. However. he puts it aggressively that Mayo’s reading of the management- worker relationship is that of a myth. and is non relevant to all directions and can non be used as a text edition reply towards covering with workers. Bramel is non the lone 1 who is critical when it comes to the Hawthorne consequence theory. Richard Gillespie. 1991. nowadayss us with the most balanced position he strongly disapproves with the Hawthorne consequence theory that satisfied employees are productive employees. Alternatively. he believes the Hawthorne consequence is capable to the readings by the assorted experts who manage the state of affairss and use the theory on their workers to accomplish the consequences they require. I believe the inquiry now lies. how can directions alter their worker’s attitudes to accomplish a trusting and productive worker? A reappraisal of: Bramel. D. ( August 1981 ) . Hawthorne. the Myth of the Docile Worker. and Class Bias in Psychology. American Psychologist. Volume 36 ( 8 ) pp. 867-878. Oreg and Berson note that careful choice procedure when choosing forces eliminates negativeness in workers and helps convey together like minded people who are passionate about their occupations and expression for work satisfaction. ( Oreg and Berson. 2011 ) In this manner. category prejudices and the struggle of involvementsbetween directors and workers is reduced. Directors can anticipate to accomplish their coveted consequences and produce a motivated work force. Directors can anticipate to maximize the capacity and public presentation of their human resources by orientating their workers to familiarize them with the company’s ends. aims and vision. assist their workers understand the changeless alterations and demands of their occupation demands and minimises misconstruing and struggles in the workplace. In other words. by puting public presentation outlooks that correspond with the worker’s value systems aid directors shape their employee’s attitudes. ( Oreg and Berson. 2011 ) Armed with such valuable information. directors who relay their outlooks and maintain an unfastened channel of communicating between themselves and their workers. allow workers to accomplish their marks utilizing their best possible agencies in the the ways most comfy to them. Integrating workers into the house is important. By supplying a flexible and comfy work environment. directors are able to to the full accomplish productiveness by leting each worker to be individualistic and make their full potency. ( David Fairhurst. 2010 ) David forests agrees that complex direction hierarchies should be removed and employees are looking for the freedom of address and their sentiments to be valued by directions. He illustrates that in order to retain the best endowments. modern directions are to be less oppressive in their direction manners and supply more piquant benefits. Employees appreciate the transparence aid in direction and no longer experience that the house is looking to work them. instead to honor public presentation based or meritocracy. ( David forests. 2010 ) Wayne Gwilym the HR manager of insularity house Rockwool is one such director. â€Å"I am a alteration manager† . Gwilym provinces. A decennary ago. the workers were negative and demotivated when Gwilym took over HR operations of the household based concern. Today. Gwilym boasts of the transmutation that the Rockwool work force has gone through and has become a valuable plus to the company. The reply for Rockwool’s work force transmutation presented to us by Gwilym was simple. It was to acquire the HR squad. directors and their workers to work together to develop employment policies as a collaborative attempt and expedite it’s execution. Today. Rockwell strongly believes that a motivated work force who trusts and looks frontward to the business’s hereafter success is one of the forces driving the concern frontward. Gwilym is a alteration director who sees the importance of giving his worker’s stretching marks and set uping a cost film editing undertaking ( Harrington. Sian. 2010 ) A study based research conducted by Anne Delarue. Geert Van Hootegem. Stephen Procter and Mark Burridge on teamwork and organisational public presentation go manus in manus with the constructs as explained to us by Gyilym. The writers suggest that an A reappraisal of: Bramel. D. ( August 1981 ) . Hawthorne. the Myth of the Docile Worker. and Class Bias in Psychology. American Psychologist. Volume 36 ( 8 ) pp. 867-878. inclusive human resource system which emphasizes on teamwork. will hold a positive consequence on employee’s occupation satisfaction. committedness and motive. These factors in bend lead to an betterment in employee attitudes and organisational public presentation. The diary points out that it is of import for directors to detect how and why employees behave and perform the manner they do. ( Anne Delarue. Geert Van Hootegem. Stephen Procter and Mark Burridge. 2008 ) Bramel’s guesss in the Hawthorne consequence theory affecting the myth of the docile workers and that category biases do be is one that I believe holds substance even in our twenty-four hours and age. Further research into the factors as pointed out by Bramel drive the same point place. category prejudices will go on to issues due to the capitalist nature of the industries and that workers are besides worlds whose mental province can non be controlled and is hard to foretell. In today’s context. direction sees the importance of a changing and flexible direction that places importance in the public assistance of it’s workers in order to obtain maximal productiveness. Our society’s demanding and invariably altering outlooks requires troughs to step up to the challenge to go a alteration director who can accommodate and happen a balance between the outlooks of the employers and it’s employees. Management manners will go on to vary and alteration. nevertheless. one fact remains. it is the managers’ responsibility to use direction techniques to cut down and extinguish menaces to the house. By contracting down the factors that causes negativeness in the workplace. directors can forestall workers’ counteractive outlooks and damaging company cultures from taking seed. As quoted from Leo Burnett. â€Å"When you reach for the stars you may non quite acquire one†¦ But you won’t come up with a smattering of mud either† . And I believe this is the mentality directors should hold when working with their workers bearing in head that the work force are the 1s who make or interrupt a house. As quoted from Will Hutton. â€Å"Human resources play a important function in the transmutation of an industry – but merely if it embraces the challenges. † ( Will Hutton. 2010 ) A reappraisal of: Bramel. D. ( August 1981 ) . Hawthorne. the Myth of the Docile Worker. and Class Bias in Psychology. American Psychologist. Volume 36 ( 8 ) pp. 867-878. Resources:Richard Gillespie. ( 1991 ) . Manufacturing Knowledge: A history of the Hawthorne experiments† . Cambridge University Press.Shaul Oreg A ; Yair Berson. ( Autumn 2011 ) . Leadership and employees’ reactions to alter: The function of Leaders’ personal properties and transformational leading manner. Personnel Psychology. Vol. 64 issue 3. pp. 627-659. Fairhurst. David. ( Nov 2010 ) . We’re in danger of losing sight of the fact employees are human existences instead than. good. human resources. Human Resources. Human Resources. pp. 15-15.David Woods. ( Nov 2010 ) . HR Lessons†¦ From history. Human Resources. pp. 62-62. Harrington. Sian. ( Nov 2010 ) . Order out of Chaos. Human Resources. pp. 29-31. Anne Delarue. Geert Van Hootegem. Stepjem Protec A ; Mark Burridge. ( 2008 ) . Teamwork and organisational public presentation: A reappraisal of survey-based research. International Journal of direction reappraisals. volume 10 issue 2. pp. 127-148 Will Hutton. ( Nov 2010 ) . We can non wish back into being mills and steel Millss that have been closed over the past 40 old ages. Human Resources. Pp 22-22.

Hawthorne The Myth of the Docile Worker Essay Essay Example

Hawthorne The Myth of the Docile Worker Essay Essay Reappraisal This diary begins with an debut to the ill-famed Hawthorne experiments led by Elton Mayo and Fritiz J. Roethlisberger. These experiments were based on Mayo’s belief in the demand to switch the focal point of direction from a scientific attack to one that valued human dealingss. The Hawthorne experiments surfaced as the innovator surveies of it’s clip in human direction psychological science. The consequences developed a theory known as the â€Å"Hawthorne effect† in which many have incorporated to organize the basicss of modern twenty-four hours human dealingss in commercialism. We will write a custom essay sample on Hawthorne The Myth of the Docile Worker Essay specifically for you for only $16.38 $13.9/page Order now We will write a custom essay sample on Hawthorne The Myth of the Docile Worker Essay specifically for you FOR ONLY $16.38 $13.9/page Hire Writer We will write a custom essay sample on Hawthorne The Myth of the Docile Worker Essay specifically for you FOR ONLY $16.38 $13.9/page Hire Writer Roethlisberger described the â€Å"Hawthorne effect† as an consciousness from the working category when particular attending is given by their directions therefore conveying about a positive alteration in productiveness. Today. the â€Å"Hawthorne effect† is even equated as merely handling employees good. Bramel is critical when pin-pointing the defects of the theory. Being unconcerned over the methodological analysis and truth of the experiments. he gives Mayo the benefit of the uncertainty and alternatively inquiries in peculiar two facets of the theory. The first of which is the premise that workers are easy manipulated by their higher directions to go constructive and cohesive with their fellow workers therefore increasing productiveness regardless of the working environment or economic system. The 2nd premise being. struggle between direction and it’s workers are due to external factors and downplays the fact that struggles of involvements between the two parties is inevitable. The truth remains that the house is exploitative in it’s capitalist nature. directors will invariably seek to increase productiveness whereas workers will ever look out for their ain economic involvement. Bramel’s reading of the Hawthorne consequence puts into play the fact that the capitalist recognizes that human dealingss is of import. However. he puts it aggressively that Mayo’s reading of the management- worker relationship is that of a myth. and is non relevant to all directions and can non be used as a text edition reply towards covering with workers. Bramel is non the lone 1 who is critical when it comes to the Hawthorne consequence theory. Richard Gillespie. 1991. nowadayss us with the most balanced position he strongly disapproves with the Hawthorne consequence theory that satisfied employees are productive employees. Alternatively. he believes the Hawthorne consequence is capable to the readings by the assorted experts who manage the state of affairss and use the theory on their workers to accomplish the consequences they require. I believe the inquiry now lies. how can directions alter their worker’s attitudes to accomplish a trusting and productive worker? A reappraisal of: Bramel. D. ( August 1981 ) . Hawthorne. the Myth of the Docile Worker. and Class Bias in Psychology. American Psychologist. Volume 36 ( 8 ) pp. 867-878. Oreg and Berson note that careful choice procedure when choosing forces eliminates negativeness in workers and helps convey together like minded people who are passionate about their occupations and expression for work satisfaction. ( Oreg and Berson. 2011 ) In this manner. category prejudices and the struggle of involvementsbetween directors and workers is reduced. Directors can anticipate to accomplish their coveted consequences and produce a motivated work force. Directors can anticipate to maximize the capacity and public presentation of their human resources by orientating their workers to familiarize them with the company’s ends. aims and vision. assist their workers understand the changeless alterations and demands of their occupation demands and minimises misconstruing and struggles in the workplace. In other words. by puting public presentation outlooks that correspond with the worker’s value systems aid directors shape their employee’s attitudes. ( Oreg and Berson. 2011 ) Armed with such valuable information. directors who relay their outlooks and maintain an unfastened channel of communicating between themselves and their workers. allow workers to accomplish their marks utilizing their best possible agencies in the the ways most comfy to them. Integrating workers into the house is important. By supplying a flexible and comfy work environment. directors are able to to the full accomplish productiveness by leting each worker to be individualistic and make their full potency. ( David Fairhurst. 2010 ) David forests agrees that complex direction hierarchies should be removed and employees are looking for the freedom of address and their sentiments to be valued by directions. He illustrates that in order to retain the best endowments. modern directions are to be less oppressive in their direction manners and supply more piquant benefits. Employees appreciate the transparence aid in direction and no longer experience that the house is looking to work them. instead to honor public presentation based or meritocracy. ( David forests. 2010 ) Wayne Gwilym the HR manager of insularity house Rockwool is one such director. â€Å"I am a alteration manager† . Gwilym provinces. A decennary ago. the workers were negative and demotivated when Gwilym took over HR operations of the household based concern. Today. Gwilym boasts of the transmutation that the Rockwool work force has gone through and has become a valuable plus to the company. The reply for Rockwool’s work force transmutation presented to us by Gwilym was simple. It was to acquire the HR squad. directors and their workers to work together to develop employment policies as a collaborative attempt and expedite it’s execution. Today. Rockwell strongly believes that a motivated work force who trusts and looks frontward to the business’s hereafter success is one of the forces driving the concern frontward. Gwilym is a alteration director who sees the importance of giving his worker’s stretching marks and set uping a cost film editing undertaking ( Harrington. Sian. 2010 ) A study based research conducted by Anne Delarue. Geert Van Hootegem. Stephen Procter and Mark Burridge on teamwork and organisational public presentation go manus in manus with the constructs as explained to us by Gyilym. The writers suggest that an A reappraisal of: Bramel. D. ( August 1981 ) . Hawthorne. the Myth of the Docile Worker. and Class Bias in Psychology. American Psychologist. Volume 36 ( 8 ) pp. 867-878. inclusive human resource system which emphasizes on teamwork. will hold a positive consequence on employee’s occupation satisfaction. committedness and motive. These factors in bend lead to an betterment in employee attitudes and organisational public presentation. The diary points out that it is of import for directors to detect how and why employees behave and perform the manner they do. ( Anne Delarue. Geert Van Hootegem. Stephen Procter and Mark Burridge. 2008 ) Bramel’s guesss in the Hawthorne consequence theory affecting the myth of the docile workers and that category biases do be is one that I believe holds substance even in our twenty-four hours and age. Further research into the factors as pointed out by Bramel drive the same point place. category prejudices will go on to issues due to the capitalist nature of the industries and that workers are besides worlds whose mental province can non be controlled and is hard to foretell. In today’s context. direction sees the importance of a changing and flexible direction that places importance in the public assistance of it’s workers in order to obtain maximal productiveness. Our society’s demanding and invariably altering outlooks requires troughs to step up to the challenge to go a alteration director who can accommodate and happen a balance between the outlooks of the employers and it’s employees. Management manners will go on to vary and alteration. nevertheless. one fact remains. it is the managers’ responsibility to use direction techniques to cut down and extinguish menaces to the house. By contracting down the factors that causes negativeness in the workplace. directors can forestall workers’ counteractive outlooks and damaging company cultures from taking seed. As quoted from Leo Burnett. â€Å"When you reach for the stars you may non quite acquire one†¦ But you won’t come up with a smattering of mud either† . And I believe this is the mentality directors should hold when working with their workers bearing in head that the work force are the 1s who make or interrupt a house. As quoted from Will Hutton. â€Å"Human resources play a important function in the transmutation of an industry – but merely if it embraces the challenges. † ( Will Hutton. 2010 ) A reappraisal of: Bramel. D. ( August 1981 ) . Hawthorne. the Myth of the Docile Worker. and Class Bias in Psychology. American Psychologist. Volume 36 ( 8 ) pp. 867-878. Resources:Richard Gillespie. ( 1991 ) . Manufacturing Knowledge: A history of the Hawthorne experiments† . Cambridge University Press.Shaul Oreg A ; Yair Berson. ( Autumn 2011 ) . Leadership and employees’ reactions to alter: The function of Leaders’ personal properties and transformational leading manner. Personnel Psychology. Vol. 64 issue 3. pp. 627-659. Fairhurst. David. ( Nov 2010 ) . We’re in danger of losing sight of the fact employees are human existences instead than. good. human resources. Human Resources. Human Resources. pp. 15-15.David Woods. ( Nov 2010 ) . HR Lessons†¦ From history. Human Resources. pp. 62-62. Harrington. Sian. ( Nov 2010 ) . Order out of Chaos. Human Resources. pp. 29-31. Anne Delarue. Geert Van Hootegem. Stepjem Protec A ; Mark Burridge. ( 2008 ) . Teamwork and organisational public presentation: A reappraisal of survey-based research. International Journal of direction reappraisals. volume 10 issue 2. pp. 127-148 Will Hutton. ( Nov 2010 ) . We can non wish back into being mills and steel Millss that have been closed over the past 40 old ages. Human Resources. Pp 22-22.

Saturday, March 7, 2020

Relates Great Expectations to fictional experiences in real life

Relates Great Expectations to fictional experiences in real life Great ExpectationsGreat Expectations, authored by Victorian novelist Charles Dickens, is considered one of his finest works of literature. It was indicative of Dickens's strong feelings for injustices and poor conditions committed on women and children of that time. Through the main character, Pip, Dickens's demonstrated the compassion he felt for children. Most readers, like myself, are able to associate Pip's experiences with their own. Pip endeavored upon many things that I can see myself doing.From the beginning of the novel Pip had felt an impending feeling of guilt. It is a common theme in Great Expectations and is one that I have felt numerous times before. In one instance, my friends and I were at a party playing with a water balloon launcher shooting balloons down the street. My neighbors had just put in a new set of porch windows that were quite expensive. With a slight aiming misalignment we broke a window and had to confess to my neighbor and give her our apologies.Englis h: "We sat down on a bench that was near" by...Pip, however, had the guilt weighed on his conscience forever-he did not have the courage to tell Mrs. Joe that he had taken a pork pie that was for Christmas dinner. Mrs. Joe only made it harder for Pip when she asked, 'And were the deuce ha' you been?' (page 20). Pip had to make a moral judgment about whether or not to tell the truth about what he did and is challenged with many more of these decisions throughout the book.Pip was later introduced to Estella, Ms. Havisham's adopted daughter, whom was taught to pursue retribution on all of the male population for her 'mother'. Pip became easily infatuated with Estella's good looks, money, and attitude. Estella considered Pip to be common and pointed out the...